BEWARE OF POISONED MUSHROOMS

With the recent rains we would like to remind all Scottie families of the danger of wild mushrooms.  Club member Suzy Sheehan has allowed us to reprint an article she wrote twelve years ago regarding her beloved Scotties’ tragic encounter.

Suzy Sheehan’s letter in part:

In early December of 2004, my husband and I were the adoptive parents of three Scottish Terriers. We had had Cutty from the time she was eight weeks old and we were looking forward to her fifteenth birthday in January of2005. Angus, the lone male, was five years of age and had been with us since he was a puppy. Stella, all of sixteen weeks, had been with us only since early November.

Monday, December 6th was completely uneventful for us. The dogs ate their breakfast in. the morning and their dinner at 5:30 p.m. everyone had a good appetite. At about 2:00 a.m. on December 7th, we were awakened to Stella vomiting in her crate next to our bed. Her vomit was mostly clear bile mixed with a very few pieces of undigested dog food. We cleaned up both dog and crate and tried to get back to sleep. Within an hour we were awakened by Cutty vomiting. Unlike Stella’s, her vomit contained a great deal of undigested food. While we were cleaning Cutty and her bed, Stella vomited again.

At that point, I called our veterinary clinic, a 24 hour facility with a veterinarian on duty at all times. The recommendation was that we monitor things to’ see if this was just a minor problem or take further action if things deteriorated. Neither of us slept much for the remainder of the night; but we also had no more vomiting from either dog.

I first sensed a more serious problem when I tried to feed Stella her breakfast in the morning. She had no interest in food or water and sat staring into space. Cutty ate a little breakfast and drank water. By 8:00 a.m., I had Stella at the veterinary clinic.

The quick diagnosis was some sort of GI problem and the veterinarian asked to keep Stella at the clinic for a day of observation and hydration. At noon Cathy, our vet, called to say that Stella seemed fine and that we could pick her up around 5 pm. At 3 pm she called to say that Stella had taken a turn for the worse. I contacted my husband and he went home to check on both Cutty and Angus. He discovered that Cutty was experiencing diarrhea and was obviously in distress. He took her to the clinic immediately and she too was placed on IV. Numerous tests and ultra sounds of the liver were done on both dogs, the results of which showed their livers were failing.

Our veterinarian told us that all of the diagnostics suggested mushroom poisoning and that neither dog would likely make it through the night. Stella died in the early afternoon on the following day. Cutty was going down rapidly and we elected to euthanize her about twenty minutes after Stella had passed. A biopsy on Stella’s liver disclosed “with about 99 certainty” that the ingestion of all or part of a toxic mushroom had led to complete liver failure which killed her and, almost certainly, Cutty.

Based on our research we have concluded the following: There are no “harmless” mushrooms in the yard, any and all must be removed immediately and disposed of in the trash (not in a compost pile). There is no way to “non-scientifically identify whether or not a mushroom is a poison verity.

Links to additional information:

http://www.mercurynews.com/2010/01/13/animal-friends-mushrooms-can-be-fatal-to-pets/

http://www.bayareamushrooms.org/mushroommonth/amanita_phalloides.html

http://aspcapro.org/sites/pro/files/zd-vetm0207f_095-100_.pdf

http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/digestive/c_dg_mushroom_poisoning

http://www.montereyherald.com/article/NF/20161208/NEWS/161209807

LIFE VESTS FOR DOGS

life-vest-corrected-jpg

A SMALL PRICE TO PAY FOR YOUR  PET’S SECURITY AND SAFETY IS HAVING A WELL MADE LIFE VEST ON HAND

THINGS TO REMEMBER
WHENEVER YOU MIGHT BE AND TAKING YOUR DOG
1. FISHING
2. PADDLE BOARDING
3. KAYAKING
4.BOATING
5.CAMPING
OR WHENEVER YOU MIGHT BE NEAR AND HAVE YOUR DOG
1. LAKES/STREAMS
2. SWIMMING POOLS
3. KOI PONDS

 

New Urine Test For Bladder Cancer

This Article was sent to me by Dr. Marcia Dawson, DVM – STCA Health Trust Chair.
Exciting news from the lab of Dr. Matthew Breen at NC State! NEW URINE TEST FOR THE DETECTION OF TCC…
Dr. Matthew Breen of NC State has developed a new urine test for the detection of bladder cancer (TCC) in dogs, and this test will soon be available to Scottie owners everywhere. Dr. Breen’s CADET test works by detecting the presence of a specific mutation in a gene called the BRAF gene. This mutation is present in 85% of the cases of canine TCC, which gives this test a very high sensitivity rating. This mutation is not present in the urine of healthy dogs or dogs that have noncancerous polyps or infection, so there is no confusion about test results. By collecting a free catch urine sample and sending this sample to Dr. Breen’s lab, we will be able to test our dogs and have results back within a couple of weeks. Furthermore, this test will pick up the presence of the mutation many months before there are any signs or symptoms of TCC in our Scotties. This super early diagnosis will allow for much earlier interventional therapies, allowing for a greater chance of making a difference in the course of the disease.
The new CADET test will be available for purchase by a year subscription plan, which will include 3 tests to be returned to Dr. Breen’s lab every 4 months, with overnight shipping included in the cost. The particulars such as how to order and the cost of the subscription will be announced soon.

So stay tuned to www.stca.biz for more info and be sure to share this announcement with your veterinarian!
Marcia Dawson DVM

The miracle of Dr. Breen’s CADETSM BRAF test is that it can detect the presence of the mutation in remarkably few cells shed in urine, long before there are any symptoms of TCC/UC, before blood is noticed in urine, before the straining to urinate and frequency of urination, and even in some cases, before an abnormality can be seen on ultrasound. In short, this new CADETSM test offers the gift of time.
The CADETSM BRAF Mutation Detection Assay is now available at a substantial discount on AKC.org for AKC registrants. The test is available as an annual screener subscription package, allowing owners to proactively test their dogs on a regular basis. The service pack includes three tests, one to be carried out every four months, instructions, urine pots for sample collection, and prepaid FedEx shipping labels to send samples directly to the testing laboratory.
For breeders, Sentinel Biomedical and the AKC offer a bulk pricing so that breeders can screen all their dogs at once for a reduced rate. Once the testing laboratory receives samples, owners and breeders will receive results within two weeks.
THE FULL ARTICLE MAY BE SEEN ON THE   AKC WEBSITE–   SEARCH BLADDER CANCER ARTICLE BY Dr. Marcia Dawson, DVM

New Cushings Study

This Article was published in Scottieshowdog.com, by Jim and Ginger McAfee.
Several of my Scotties participated in the Research for Atypical Cushing’s in Scotties from the Virginia-Maryland College of Vet Medicine for a couple of years, in fact we had blood drawn at our Rescue Picnic one year. Here is the preliminary findings. I received this from Mindy Quigley, the Clinical Research Coordinator, and have her permission to forward this. I asked her if it made any difference if the dog was spayed or neutered and she said there was no difference. It will be published in a couple of months and she will send me the link when it is up. This is very interesting and you might want to share it with your vet.   Ginger

A member of our Club The San Francisco Bay STC also had her Scottie “Abagayle” Sweeney participate in this study. Sue also has this same report.
From: Quigley, Mindy
Subject: Scottie research study update
Dear Scottie supporters,

Thank you to those veterinarians and owners who participated in the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine’s study of Atypical Cushing’s in Scottish terriers. We wanted to provide an update on our research findings for those who may be interested in learning more.
Atypical Cushing’s in Scotties
Cushing’s disease is a chronic debilitating disorder in dogs. Scotties have an unusually high incidence of Cushing’s. It can contribute to the development of diabetes, obesity, immune system problems, inappropriate urination, and other negative health outcomes. In normal dogs, the pituitary gland and adrenal glands produce hormones necessary for the function of many systems in the body. If something goes wrong in these glands and certain hormones are overproduced, then Cushing’s can develop. These abnormalities are often detected by observing clinical signs and when routine blood work shows elevations in a liver protein called ALP.
Our Earlier Findings
Preliminary data indicate that in Scottish Terriers, the cause of atypical Cushing’s appears to be due to excessive amounts of noncortisol steroids, which is an atypical form of the disease. These findings prompted the group at the vet school here to speculate that there might be a unique underlying cause for atypical Cushing’s in this breed. The study you participated in was designed to test those theories.

Our preliminary research, which has been ongoing for several years, had already figured out a few things:

  • In the most common form of Cushing’s, excessive amounts of a single hormone from the pituitary gland signals the adrenal gland to overproduce cortisol. However, in Scotties excessive amounts of sex hormones, not cortisol, are observed.
  • This increased production of adrenal sex hormones is not due to excessive amounts of a variety of pituitary signaling hormones.
  • These elevated concentrations of sex hormones are the cause for the increased ALP values commonly seen in these dogs.
  • There is no indication of adrenal cancer as a cause for this increased production of sex hormones.
  • The magnitude of ALP elevations increases over time, but pituitary and adrenal regulation do not change.

The Virginia-Maryland college team identified 3 candidate genes in a very small pool of patients which are uniquely expressed in Scotties with atypical disease compared to normal Scotties and other breeds with Cushing’s disease, and undertook the study you participated in to understand how these genes might influence the development of atypical Cushing’s.
The Newest Study
The latest study you participated in found that there was indeed a genomic variation in Scottish terriers that was associated with increased serum ALP activity. The variation was located on the same chromosome as a gene responsible for inactivation of sex steroids. Genes can be active (expressed) or inactive (not expressed). If genes are overexpressed, their effect can increase. If they are under expressed, their effect is reduced. In Scotties, the sex steroid inactivation gene was under expressed in comparison to other breeds with Cushing’s disease (pituitary dependent hyperadrenocorticism). We suggest the gene variation seen in Scotties may be linked with “turning off” this sex steroid inactivation gene, leading to increased concentrations of sex steroids. We believe the higher concentrations of these sex steroids may explain commonly observed liver and ALP changes seen in Scottish terriers.
Questions?
The results will be published in academic journals, shared with the AKC’s Canine Health Foundation, and published on the AVMA’s clinical research website. We hope that better understanding of the mechanisms of this disease in Scotties can lead to better treatments for affected dogs.

If you have any questions about this research, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.
Mindy Quigley
Clinical Trials Coordinator
Veterinary Clinical Research Office
Virginia Tech
Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
205 Duck Pond Drive
Blacksburg, VA 24061
Office Phone: 540-231-1363
Web: http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/clinical-trials/

 

 

Rattlesnake Bites – To Vaccinate, or Not

       I recently purchased a 7 month old Scottish Terrier puppy from South California and in reviewing the health records I saw my puppy had received a rattlesnake vaccination. Knowing little about the vaccination I decided to do some quick research about the vaccination. Regardless of the breed of dog, knowing about the risks can make a difference.
     What is the vaccination? The vaccination is an injectable vaccine, first developed by Red Rock Biologics, a company located near Sacramento, California. This vaccination is specific to a common rattlesnake found in the California, the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake. (Red Rock Biologics Rattlesnake Vaccines, 2016)
     What is risk and should you consider this vaccination? Like any vaccination there are pros and cons and you discuss the risk with your veterinarian. Some quick background information may helpful in considering this vaccination. A first consideration is your location and the likelihood you may encounter a poisonous snake. Just like giving my Scotties their heartworm pill, it is yet another medication I worry about and why give you dog a medication when the risk is low. In my breeder’s case, they lived in an area where rattlesnakes are commonly found amongst urban living. My puppy’s breeder happens to live in the foothills of South California, and their property was in a semi-rural environment. As a result all six puppies in the litter and all the adult dogs have all been vaccinated.
According the Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI), a Nationwide Insurance company states that “approximately 300,000 dogs and cats are bitten annually in the United States from venomous snakes.” (Rattlesnake Vaccine for Dogs, 2016) While the statistic may sound alarming, your decision should factor in risks. Pet owners face a long list of potential threats, and this is one more to add to the list.
     Are the Vaccinations Safe, Side-Effects and are they Effective? This depends on who you ask. The vaccination has been United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) since October, 2004, and in use in California since July 2003. Dosage may vary as directed by your veterinarian, but according the manufacturer of the vaccine; “the first time your dog is vaccinated, we recommend an initial vaccine injection followed by a booster dose about one month later. We recommend then boostering each subsequent year.” (Red Rock Biologics Rattlesnake Vaccines, 2016).
UC Davis describes the side effects as minimal and flu-like if they occur at all, but if you are concerned, read the short article used in this summary. The recommend (UCDAVIS Veterinary Medicine, 2016)
     What is the cost of vaccination? The vaccination costs will vary from $20.00 to $40.00 per injection according the UC Davis Veterinary Medicine. (UCDAVIS Veterinary Medicine, 2016)More Information? The websites used in this summary provide additional information, some in easy to read, frequently asked question format that provides further information, and the UC Davis site does address some health concerns and provides a more of objective overall view of the subject.
     Works Cited:
Rattlesnake Vaccine for Dogs. (2016, July 10). Retrieved July 10, 2016, from What Pet Ownders Should Know: http://www.petinsurance.com/healthzone/pet-articles/pet-health/Rattlesnake-Vaccine-for-Dogs.aspx

Red Rock Biologics Rattlesnake Vaccines. (2016, July 10th). Retrieved July 10, 2016, from Frequently Asked Questions: http://www.redrockbiologics.com/rattlesnake_vaccine_faq.php

UCDAVIS Veterinary Medicine. (2016, July 10). Retrieved July 10`, 2016, from Avoic Snakebite dueing Summer Pet Outings: http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/whatsnew/article.cfm?id=1883

Many thanks to  SFBSTC member Jim Nolte for sharing this information.

AKC Notice

An important notice just received from the American Kennel Club

Dear AKC Club Leader,

Occasionally we ask for your assistance in bringing attention to piece of legislation that could impact the sport. Today, we’re asking for your help in bringing attention to  a fun new project — The Dog Lover, a new limited run film that will be debuting in select theatres and through Video on Demand on July 8.

This dramatic film tells the story – based on true events – of a young woman who goes undercover for an animal rights organization and learns first-hand about the extreme tactics animal rights groups are willing to use against dog breeders.

The Dog Lover is an entertaining film that makes a courageous statement in defense of breeders. Its producers deserve all the support (through theatre visits or on demand views) we can help give it. Let’s make a statement in supporting this film – and  please help us in giving it an opening weekend beyond all expectations.

Please share the following trailer, flyers and information with club members on your website, social media, etc — and ask them to do the same.

http://www.akc.org/news/movie-review-dog-lover/ (review and trailer)

www.thedoglovermovie.com ( official website)

The Dog Lover (printable flyer)

The flyers and website provide information on theatres where the film will be playing on the weekend of July 8.

Thanks and have a wonderful holiday weekend!

 

AKC Government Relations